Comments on Arthur B's Phillips & Keatman, Questers Extraordinaire

Being a review of two seminal texts in the curious microgenre of "psychic questing".

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Ronan Wills at 18:20 on 2018-10-10
Never heard of these books or this genre before. It's fascinating stuff.

I've always loved these kinds of intersections between reality and fiction, like the pre-release Blair Witch marketing or that fake Juaquin Phoenix documentary. But of course, in those cases the creators gave up the ruse once the story was released to the world.

As a writer, I can see the appeal of "psychic questing" if it was taken purely as a literary exercise; maybe by travelling to interesting locations with a basic premise in mind and letting the story that unfolds be dictated by the sights, events and feelings you encounter rather than via conscious planning. If someone like Stephen King put out a Totally Real And Accurate (wink wink) account of his spooky trip to the Winchester Mystery House or wherever, I bet a lot of people would be only too happy to play along.

(I'd argue that paranormal "investigators" like John Keel in The Mothman Prophecies were doing exactly this, just without being aware of it)

I always view phenomenon like this as arising from a need for the kinds of imaginative play people indulge in as children, but which society tells us we're supposed to give up as adults.
Arthur B at 14:51 on 2018-10-11
(I'd argue that paranormal "investigators" like John Keel in The Mothman Prophecies were doing exactly this, just without being aware of it)

I'm not 100% convinced that Phillips and Keatman are aware of the fabrications here. On the one hand, some of the stuff they describe seems pretty wild and for supposed paranormal investigators they seem to be pretty crap at actually getting photos of strange phenomena when they happen. (In Andrew Collins' stuff he makes it clear that a lot of stuff is only seen in the "mind's eye", which is a bit more of an excuse.)

I'm pretty sure someone involved in the Green Stone investigation was involved in the faking - probably the Sunderland family - since someone had to plant the items to be found. But I suspect at least a portion of the ParaSearch team were just very, very willing to believe.
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